Free Marketing: Facebook and Twitter

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Facebook is one of the easiest social media sites to get started on and lets you reach the widest possible audience by attracting vast numbers of Facebook “Friends.”

You probably already have a personal Facebook page, but you will want to start a separate one for your business. This is going to be your business’ Facebook Fan Page.

Whenever anybody on Facebook “Likes” your business’ fan page, they automatically become your Friend. Then, whenever you post a status update on your Fan Page, it will be distributed to all of your Fans/Friends.

Collect “Likes”

The success of your free Facebook marketing program relies on your ability to gain as many Fans as possible. Start by sending invitations to “Like” your Fan Page to the social media contacts on your personal Facebook page, like family, friends, and acquaintances.

Visit their Facebook home pages, taking note of who their Friends are. Send invitations to their Friends, especially those who have the highest amount of social media contacts.

Take a look at what groups they belong to. Whenever they post a status update, always “Like” it and add a comment so you can develop your relationship with them and get them to be more interactive with your Fan Page.

Nurture Relationships with Passionate Fans

Be consistent in developing interpersonal relationships with your Friends on your Facebook Fan Page. Direct message them on Facebook or Twitter and let them know how much you enjoy their posts. Eventually, they will start paying attention to you.

Once you have nurtured a positive online relationship, you can send your Facebook Fans links to valuable content for free interspersed with periodic promotions for your products. For example, if your niche is health and fitness, you might send them a link to a 30-day plan for six-pack abs.

Make sure the specific content you send is something your contacts will value and appreciate receiving from you for free so that you can create a trust bond with them. This subconsciously will make them feel indebted to you so they will be more likely to promote future offerings from you to their social media network.

Always encourage your contacts to give your pages social approval signals whenever possible by including things like: “Like us on Facebook!” This will improve your search engine rankings.

Twitter Marketing

On Twitter, your posts are limited to 140 characters, but that’s plenty of room to include links to other websites, pictures, videos slideshows, and other media. Twitter is a fast and efficient way to get your products and services in front of a lot of people.

Twitter instantly links users to a large number of people–both who they know and who they don’t know–making it one of the most immediate and effective ways to communicate ever created.

Building Followers

The goal with Twitter is to attract as many followers as you can. Like Facebook, you should start by searching for people you know, including loyal customers, family, friends, acquaintances, co-workers, and current and former school mates. Use the search function to look for their Twitter accounts, and then follow them.

The next step is to go to their profile and see who they are following and who is following them. Look for people you either know already or who are friends of friends and follow them. Keep a careful eye out for people who have the most followers themselves and follow them. That way, if they tweet something you post, it has a better chance of going viral.

Whenever you follow somebody, they will get a notification that you are following them. Usually, people on Twitter will follow you back. When they do, your list of Twitter followers becomes populated with people who are already fans of the types of products you are promoting.

Increase your list of highly targeted prospects by searching for tweets about your niche. For example, if you are working in the high-end clothing business, simply conduct a search for “#eveningwear.”

Identify “Social Influencers”

Then all you have to do is go to the profiles of people who have recently tweeted in this niche and look at their list of followers. If they have a lot, they fall into a category known as “social influencers.” You definitely want to follow those people.

Hopefully, they will follow you back. When they do, whenever you tweet something, it will appear on their Twitter scroll. There is also the possibility they will retweet it so that their followers will see it as well.

Like Facebook, you want to find people on Twitter who are passionately interested in your niche and who have the most followers. These are the people with whom you want to build interpersonal relationships, because they can provide you access to the most prospective customers.

To get double the mileage from your efforts, link your Twitter to your Facebook and vice versa so that every time you post on one site, it automatically posts on the other.

It’s easy to do: All you need to do is follow the instructions on either site. Don’t forget to promote your Twitter feed in all the same places you promote your Facebook page.

To learn more techniques like these for improving the profitability of your business, check out our lead generation system by clicking on this link now.

Using Keywords to Improve Your Page Rankings

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Search engines are powered by the words users enter when they conduct searches. These are called “keywords.”

Google and other search engines use keywords to provide the links to websites they think the user will find most helpful. These results are then ranked according to Google’s search engine algorithm.

By discovering the best keywords for your internet marketing niche and including them in strategic places on your web pages, you can improve your ranking on the Search Engine Result Pages (SERPs) for those keywords.

Conducting Keyword Research

Keyword research means finding the best keywords for your product niche. When you optimize your web pages with the best keywords, search engines like Google and Bing will index your pages and rank them higher, ideally in the top three spots.

If you use bad keywords or don’t optimize them correctly within your web pages, your pages will be ranked so low that nobody is going to find them.

The first step is to create an initial list of possible keywords. Basically, you will be brainstorming ideas. For example, if your product is a dog obedience course–which happens to be an evergreen niche–your initial list might include keywords like:

Dog obedience

Puppy house training

Canine obedience

How to train your dog

Dog training

Puppy obedience

Write down all the main categories of your niche and any other words or phrases that might fall under each of those categories, and then create as many variations as you can of those keywords.

Come up with the best list of both general and specific keywords that you can. You will test them later to see which ones are the most effective.

Make sure you pick between two and five words within your keyword phrases. Anything longer than that and the likelihood that people will type them into the search engine goes down. An exception to this rule is when you include “How do I …” or “Top 10 Ways to …” as part of your keywords. These tend to work pretty well. However, in most cases, your keyword phrases should be brief.

Finding the Most Successful Keywords

Ideally, the keywords you choose should be overripe and underexploited. In other words, they should be keywords that describe things that have a lot of people looking for products in that sub-niche, with not a lot of other people offering them. Find these and you can virtually print money.

Now you want to do monthly searches in keywords for your niche, and also find out how much competition each has. Google has a free Adwords Keyword Tool you can use to search for various keywords. Because Google has the biggest and most popular search engine, it makes sense to use its tools to find the best niches–especially when they’re free!

The next step is to find within this general niche those sub-niches that are overripe and underexploited.

Long Tail Keywords

Long tail keywords are the words and phrases users type in to search for a particular niche. They make it easier for you to hone in on the specific target audiences within your niche.

For example, they can be geographically based–such as “Atlanta dog obedience schools”–to make them more specific. Keep track of all the long tail keywords you find so you can focus on these secondary ones that still get a lot of searches but aren’t already being used by other marketers.

Keyword Placement

Where you place the keywords is really important. Search engines prefer to see your keywords and phrases in the headline, in sub-headlines, and in the first and last paragraphs.

Your primary keyword also should be included in your URL, or web address name.

WordPress has a handy All-in-One SEO Pack plug-in that automatically includes keywords in your metadata, which are the little descriptions beneath each link on Google. You also can use

and

to break up your page with headings and to let search engines know which keywords are important on your pages. Type one or more keywords into your image file name and also include it in the ALT text for the image for extra measure.

Keyword Saturation

In the remaining part of your page content, where you distribute them isn’t as important as long as you have the proper saturation level.

Include keywords within your content the optimal number of times, known as keyword saturation. Search engines give a higher ranking to pages that have keyword saturation of about 2%. If your web content is 500 words, your keywords should be included about 10 times:

500 (Total # of Words) x .02 (Optimal KW Saturation Rate) = 10.

The 10-Step Structure for Sales Pages That Sell

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Sales pages take many different forms, but share the same basic structure:

  1. Headline
  2. Sub Headline
  3. Presentation of the problem
  4. Introduction of your product as the solution
  5. Social Proof
  6. Bonuses
  7. Offer
  8. Guarantee
  9. Call to Action
  10. P.S.

Creating Killer Headlines

Your headline is the first opportunity gaining your customer’s interest by making an emotional appeal to whatever problem they are trying to solve.

Headlines should be clear and easy to understand, should include your keywords, and need to attract the reader to keep reading further.

Presentation of the Problem

Right after the headline and sub headline, you want to present the problem that the customer is having, focusing especially on the customer’s pain.

For example, if your niche is dating and relationships, you could present the problem like this:

“Are you tired of striking out when it comes to the opposite sex? Do you get a tight feeling in your stomach whenever you see a happy couple because it makes you wonder if you will ever find the right mate?”

Introduction of Your Product as the Solution

On your sales page, your product should always be the best – or better yet, the only – solution to whatever problem you have just stated.

It’s critical that you portray your product as not just one of many possible solutions, but as the only solution that will give your customers the exact type of relief from whatever pain they are experiencing.

Social Proof

Social proof, also known as the “bandwagon approach,” is when you show your prospects how other people have benefitted from your product.

Social proof often takes the form of product reviews or testimonials. You also can include stories about people who have experienced profound improvements to their lives as a result of your product.

Bonuses

Bonuses aren’t always essential, but they can often help “sweeten the pot” and help customers make the decision to buy if they are on the fence. Usually, they are one or two additional products that are related to your primary product’s niche you throw in for free.

You can include anywhere from one to three bonuses. More than three can make it too confusing for the customer.

Make sure you assign a value to the bonus: “The WordPress dictionary ordinarily sells for $19 and the keyword software is worth $29, but they are yours for free if you purchase the main product now!” This lets you increase the perceived value of your offer.

Guarantee

You almost always want to offer a guarantee. For one, it’s just good business. If you aren’t backing up your products with a money-back guarantee, some people might wonder if there is something wrong with your products. Second, guarantees are so common that it will seem strange if you don’t offer one.

You want to limit your guarantee to 30- or 60-days from the day of sale so you don’t have customers coming back months or even years later looking for a refund. It’s a good idea to always provide refunds quickly if a customer requests it.

With digital products, you generally want to let them keep the product rather than send it back because it builds goodwill and makes them more likely to purchase more products from you in the future.

Offering a guarantee also removes risk for the customer: If they don’t like it, they can have their money back. Some people will buy your products and ask for refunds just so they can get the product for free, but not many, so it’s worth it to provide a guarantee every time.

Call to Action

Your Call to Action (CTA) is the most important part of your landing page. Your CTA is where you tell your customers exactly what it is you want them to do: Buy this product, subscribe to this website, and so on.

It is critical that your CTA is clear and to the point. There can be no ambiguity about what it is you want your customer to do. Even if you are a little forceful, that’s okay. Don’t suggest, tell.

By the time readers have made it all the way through your sales letter to the CTA, they probably are ready to buy anyway. Your job with the CTA is to push them into taking action.

P.S.

The P.S. can be an effective last-minute way to close the sale. The P.S. stands for “post-script” and it can be used either to restate the central points of the sales letter or introduce something new, like adding scarcity or another bonus.

More than one P.S. is okay if you want, but they probably should be capped at three otherwise there’s a higher chance your customer will stop reading. In your P.S., remind the reader of the deal or special offer and add urgency.

4 Ways to Attract New Website Visitors

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Right now, people have more unrestricted access to information, entertainment and other content than in any other time in history. While that is great for people looking to be informed, educated or entertained, it can present a challenge for online marketers seeking to capture the biggest possible audience.

That’s because there’s simply more competition for your target audience than ever before. So if the content you are using to attract visitors to your pages isn’t interesting, cutting edge and exciting, you are going to have a difficult time getting people to visit or stay on your pages once they land there.

  1. Would You Be Interested In Your Content?

A good starting point in determining whether the content you are providing is vital and engaging for your target audience is to consider whether you would be interested in your pages if you were an outside visitor looking for content within your niche.

Why would you be drawn to your web pages? What are you offering your visitors that they can’t get anywhere else? How are you communicating to your core audience that the content you offer is unique, entertaining and engaging?

Think about these questions and then identify the areas where you are failing to live up to your own standards. Those are the areas you should then focus on repairing.

  1. Be Controversial … But Not TOO Controversial!

If you want to attract eyeballs, you need to have something to say. Choose topics within your niche that are “hot button” issues. Visitors arrive on your pages with their own opinions, but if you have something relevant and insightful to say about a current event or a controversial issue within your niche, they are going to want to hear it.

Yet you should temper your words so that you don’t go too far, otherwise you risk turning your visitors off. Stay away from extreme views or radical arguments. You can and should take a stand based on your beliefs, experience and knowledge, but avoid giving the impression that you are close-minded or fanatical.

Visitors to your pages want to feel as if they are engaging in a conversation, not listening to a diatribe or monologue. Invite others to share their thoughts and let them know you value what they have to say. That way they will be more likely to return to your pages later.

  1. Sex Sells

There’s no way around it: Sex sells. It’s simply the way we are hard-wired as humans. We are attracted to anything that turns us on or stimulates our sexual curiosity.

Obviously, this is something that successful marketers have known about since the beginning of time – or at least the beginning of advertising. If you want to attract more visitors to your pages, look for ways to ratchet up the sex appeal – even if your subject matter doesn’t ordinarily lend itself to being sexualized.

Sexy images are also always a huge draw, especially when they are used tastefully. Consider what your core audience wants, then give it to them.

  1. Mimic the Most Popular Sites in Your Niche

With Internet marketing, there’s usually no reason to reinvent the wheel. Conduct a little research to determine what the most successful marketers in your niche are doing, then steal their best ideas and make them your own.

Obviously, you don’t want to plagiarize or do anything unethical. But you can discover the most successful themes and topics and put your own spin on them in order to capture more visitors. Observe market forces to recognize what the public wants, then provide them with it.

One of the biggest benefits of the Internet is its global scale and universal timeliness. Whatever niche you are working in, there are certain to be hundreds – if not thousands – of other people competing for the same audience you are targeting.

By giving your visitors content that you would find interesting, focusing on hot button issues that fans of your niche have strong opinions about, injecting sex appeal whenever and wherever possible, and stealing the best ideas from the most successful marketers in your niche, you can choose topics that draw more visitors to your website.

3 Steps to Creating High-Converting Headlines

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Headlines is one of the most important part of any marketing document, be it an email, a sales letter, squeeze page or paid advertisement. That’s because the headline is your first and only opportunity to capture the attention of the prospective customer.

If your headline fails to make an instant, immediate impression upon your reader, they will stop reading further and probably are lost to you forever.

The best headlines – those that grasp your page visitor by the lapels, shake them up and refuse to let go – share three common traits. If you ensure that your headlines always includes these three qualities, you can attract a greater number of prospects to spend more time with your copy and enhance your chances of converting them into a long-term customer, which is the ultimate objective of any marketing document.

Clarity Is King

The first and most important quality of any great headline is that it can be immediately understood by anybody who is reading it. The more clarity a headline has, the more appealing it will be to page visitors.

If your headline is in any way ambiguous, confusing, or doesn’t provide a clear and concise message that can be grasped instantly, it is going to turn readers away in droves. Clear, easy to understand headlines should be as specific as possible.

Remember, the people who are landing on your pages or seeing your ads are looking for solutions and answers. The last thing they want to do is to spend more time trying to figure out what is meant by an ambiguous or uncertain headline. Be as clear as you possibly can.

Headlines Have Two Parts

The most effective headlines have two parts: The headline itself and the sub-headline, also known as the “sub-head”. One way to think of it is like this: The headline is the bait that gets the prospect in the door and the sub-head is what you use to hook them in so they will keep reading.

A clear and concise headline is critical, but by itself it usually is not enough to fully engage the reader. It needs help – in the form of a great, informative sub-head that boosts the clarity the reader gets from the headline.

The sub-head acts to reaffirm the reason why your reader has landed on your page or looked at your ad in the first place. It should set the stage for the story your content is about to tell them.

The Best Headlines Include Numbers

There is a whole body of research that proves that people using the Internet are astronomically more likely to click through on a headline that includes a number than one that simply includes words. This has something to do with the way our minds are wired.

Numbers express certainty. They subconsciously tell the reader that the message expressed in the headline is based on substance and fact, so people seeking solutions or answers online are naturally more attracted to headlines that include numbers than they are to just words.

The numbers you put in your headlines can include all kinds of figures, including percentages, the amount of things on lists, time measurements, and so on:

“3-Day Free Trial for All New Subscribers”

“Top 5 Ways to Shed Weight Fast”

“Increase Sales by 30% in 30 Days Using This One Weird Trick”

Generally, the number will be in the main headline rather than the sub-head. But the information in the sub-head should support whatever number you include in the headline.

These three qualities are so widely used that headlines that don’t include them are often perceived as jarring or off-putting – and usually fail to convert. Successful marketers understand what works and what doesn’t, so they gravitate toward the tried and true in order to maximize their results.

If you keep your headlines clear and to the point, include sub-headlines that support the primary point of the main headline, and include numbers to give your headline substance and authority, you can exponentially increase your conversion rates regardless of what type of marketing document you are using.

Email Marketing Etiquette to Get Your Mails Delivered and Read

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Email marketing can be a very effective way of bringing new customers into your sales funnel. But due to the widespread use of viruses and malware, most people are cautious about opening an email that comes from a source they don’t recognize, that is strangely written, or appears to have come from a non-English speaker.
You can reassure your prospective customers that the emails you send are safe and reliable by following a few simple email marketing etiquette rules:

1. Don’t Sensationalize the Headline

The default setting for Yahoo, AOL, Gmail, and the other popular email providers is to show who the sender is and the headline. In some instances, the first few words of the email text itself will appear on the user’s email queue.

That makes the headline the first important element of your email. If it is overly exaggerated, makes extraordinary claims, or is otherwise sensational, there’s a better chance that the email will either be sent directly to the “Spam” folder or deleted by the user without being read.

The objective is to get the reader to open the email, so your headline has to give them a reason to do so. You want to capture their imagination and engage their interest, but not go over the top. Avoid using exclamation points – especially multiple exclamation points – as well as ALL CAPS and crazy colors because this will most likely tag your email as spam.

2. Use the Person’s Name, If Known

The greeting is the first thing the reader will see when they open your email. If you know the user’s name (because you either know them personally, they are already on your list, or their name was included on an email list you have purchased) use your autoresponder to insert their first name in the greeting, such as “Dear Paul” or “Dear Sandra.”

Email tends to be less formal than traditional letter-writing, so in most cases using the person’s first name is perfectly acceptable. Using the person’s last name can often seem off-putting, such as “Dear Mr. Stewart” or “Dear Ms. Simpson.” Exceptions would include formal titles such as “Doctor,” “Professor,” or a military title.

3. Get to the Point

Because emails are less formalized than traditional letter-writing, and because people get so many emails every day, the person receiving your email probably isn’t going to give it much attention. That’s why it is critically important that you get to the point of your email right away, starting with the very first sentence.

In email writing, you have to give the reader a reason to keep reading. Don’t waste time by beating around the bush or trying to build up to your point slowly. You have only a few moments to maintain the reader’s attention, so make the most of it.

4. Signing Off

Another difference between traditional letter writing and emails is the sign-off. You don’t have to include a formal “Sincerely” or “Gratefully yours.”

Simply ending with your name is perfectly acceptable. Or, if you prefer, you can use an informal phrase such as “Chat with you soon” or “Cheers.”

Following these general email etiquette protocols will increase the chances that the person receiving your email will open it and read it. Make sure the content of your email pushes the person to the action that you want them to perform, such as clicking on a link included in the body of your email.

Hello and Welcome!

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Well this is my very first post on this blog. I will try to post valuable information mostly about internet marketing and online business.

My best

//Roger